Archive | Agriculture

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COLOMBIA: Climate Science Reaching Out for Traditional Farmers’ Wisdom

Posted on 02 December 2010 by admin

By Daniela Estrada*

SANTIAGO, Dec 2, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – The wide-ranging knowledge about climate variation possessed by native people and other small farmers, such as the people in one region of Colombia, is almost a perfect match to scientific measurements recorded on high-tech instruments. Continue Reading

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Food Versus Biofuels Debate Continues in Africa

Posted on 01 December 2010 by admin

Jatropha berries. Credit: John Bwakali/IPS

Jatropha berries. Credit: John Bwakali/IPS

By Mantoe Phakathi

MBABANE, Dec 1, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – “We’re going to Cancun no better off than we were in Copenhagen,” said Thuli Makama, the director of Friends of the Earth Swaziland, as she prepared to leave for the climate negotiations in Mexico. Continue Reading

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Activists Call for Women in Forests Agreement

Posted on 01 December 2010 by admin

Indigenous coffee grower in PerĂș. Milagros Salazar/IPS

By Rosebell Kagumire

CANCÚN, Mexico, Dec 2, 2010 – (IPS/TerraViva) Conservation activists are calling for the recognition of women in any agreement on reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Continue Reading

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UGANDA: Carbon Finance May Not Benefit Forest Communities

Posted on 30 November 2010 by admin

Mabira Forest, Uganda. Credit: S A Perez/Wikicommons

Mabira Forest, Uganda. Credit: S A Perez/Wikicommons/

By Rosebell Kagumire*

KAMPALA, Nov 30, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – Uganda has lost more than two million hectares of forest since 1990, mostly converted to farmland by a growing population of smallholders. Carbon finance through the REDD programme is often presented as one way to arrest this destruction, but only if the benefits clearly translate to the grassroots. Continue Reading

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Changing Lives – Agriculture in Africa to take the brunt of climate change

Posted on 29 November 2010 by admin

Posted by Tinus de Jager
November 29, 2010

In this Podcast:
- Agriculture researchers want to make their results more practical
- Africa expects a three to four degree rise in temperature
- And using different crops could have positive results

 

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Colombia Tests Forage Crops Against Climate Change

Posted on 25 November 2010 by admin

An experimental grass crop at CIAT's Colombian headquarters. Credit:Neil Palmer/Courtesy of CIAT.

By Constanza Vieira*

BOGOTÁ, Nov 25, 2010 (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – Colombia, with 24 million head of cattle, is showcasing two advances towards reducing the 13 percent of climate-changing gas emissions attributed to livestock production around the world. Continue Reading

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Colombia investiga forrajes contra el cambio climĂĄtico

Posted on 24 November 2010 by admin

Cultivo experimental de brachiaria en la sede colombiana del CIAT.  CrĂ©dito: Neil Palmer – CortesĂ­a CIAT

Cultivo experimental de brachiaria en la sede colombiana del CIAT. CrĂ©dito: Neil Palmer – CortesĂ­a CIAT

Por Constanza Vieira

BOGOTÁ, nov (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – Colombia, con 24 millones de cabezas de ganado, exhibe dos avances para reducir ese 13 por ciento de gases de efecto invernadero que se le achaca a la industria planetaria de rumiantes. Continue Reading

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CENTRAL AMERICA: Water as a ‘Divine Gift’

Posted on 23 November 2010 by admin

Maize is a food staple in Guatemala's "Dry Corridor," which has been hit by both drought and flood. Credit:Danilo Valladares/IPS.

By Danilo Valladares*

GUATEMALA CITY, Nov 23, 2010 (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – “Many people still believe that water is a gift from God.” This statement from a Guatemalan scientist alludes to Central America’s neglect of its water resources – and the subsequent impact on agriculture. Continue Reading

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Mexican Farms Need a Water Revolution

Posted on 17 November 2010 by admin

An irrigation pond in rural Chiapas, Mexico. Credit:Mauricio Ramos/IPS.

By Emilio Godoy*

MEXICO CITY, Nov 17, 2010 (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – Without financing, many Mexican farmers cannot improve their ageing irrigation systems, which are essential if Mexico is to withstand the effects of climate change and reduce its emissions of greenhouse-effect gases.
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JAPAN: Climate Change Concerns Give Aid A Green Hue

Posted on 07 October 2010 by admin

By Suvendrini Kakuchi*

TOKYO, Oct 7, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – It may not be easy to imagine Japan as a jolly green giant, but to several Asian countries that have been enjoying environmental projects funded by Japanese aid, that’s what this nation has resembled in the last two decades. Continue Reading

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Photos from our Flickr stream

Waves and high tides are eating away at the beaches in Costa Rica’s Cahuita National Park, where the vegetation is uprooted and washed into the sea. Credit: Diego Arguedas/IPSInformal gold mining is the main source of mercury emissions in Latin America. An artisanal gold miner in El Corpus, Choluteca along the Pacific ocean in Honduras. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS.Community leader Olga Vargas and her granddaughter Valery (backs turned to the camera) chat with local residents on one of the hiking paths that the Women’s Association created in the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIn Quebrada Grande, the Agrarian Development Institute dedicated 119 hectares of land to forest conservation, which the Womens’ Association has been looking after for over a decade. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPS
The expansion of pineapple cultivation to the north of the capital San JosĂ© has put pressure on forests in Costa Rica. There are pineapple plantations and a packing plant right behind the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSOlga Vargas next to the greenhouse with which the Quebrada Grande de Pital Women’s Association began to revitalise its sustainable business, whose priority is reforestation. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIsabel Michi carefully tends seedlings in the greenhouse on her small organic farm in the settlement of MutirĂŁo Eldorado in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: FabĂ­ola Ortiz/IPSVegetation is beginning to cover the dunes separating the sea from the mouth of the  AguĂĄn river. Thanks to the recovery of the dunes, the town is more protected from the wind, and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Credit: Thelma MejĂ­a/IPS

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