Khor: Climate Funding a “Chicken and Egg Problem”

Posted on 10 December 2010 by admin

Martin Khor. Courtesy of the South Centre.

Nastasya Tay interviews MARTIN KHOR, Executive Director of the South Centre

CANCÚN, Dec 10, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – As negotiations approach their conclusion at COP16, Nastasya Tay speaks to Martin Khor, the Executive Director of the South Centre, a civil society organisation that champions the views of the developing world, to see what developing countries hope to achieve in this round of talks.

 

Or download mp3.

Follow Nastasya on Twitter @NastasyaTay.

Listen to TerraViva’s other COP16 Podcasts here.

1 Comments For This Post

  1. Dr. Frans Verhagen Says:

    There are alternatives to the KP! That was the title of the press conference that IIMT organized on December 8 at the Desierto media center. The PowerPoint, press release and media advisory can be found at the timun.net website. Also there is the OPED article entitled “Creative Destruction” sent to the NY Times.

    We have to start thinking of greening the international monetary system by basing it on a carbon-standard that would help to combat the climate crisis by advancing low carbon, climate resilient development. Also this new global monetary governance system is able to create liquidity for worthwhile climate and development projects.

1 Trackbacks For This Post

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