Tag Archive | "Adaptation"

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Emissions Punted to Durban, Breakthrough Seen on Forests

Posted on 11 December 2010 by admin

By Stephen Leahy

CANCĂšN, Dec 11, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – If success is measured by delaying difficult decisions, then the CancĂşn climate meeting succeeded by deferring crucial issues over financing and new targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the next Conference of the Parties meeting a year from now in Durban, South Africa. Continue Reading

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Urgently Searching for a Path Forward

Posted on 10 December 2010 by admin

By Nastasya Tay

CANCĂšN, Mexico, Dec 10, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – Civil society organisations here are demanding real progress in talks at the 16th Conference of the Parties on the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change.
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Climate Changes Herald a Future of Widespread Drought

Posted on 09 December 2010 by admin

Climate-driven changes in the water cycle will affect large regions of the world. Credit: Friedrich Böhringer/creative commons license

By Stephen Leahy

CANCĂšN, Dec 8, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – As the world heats up, continents are drying up, with severe droughts forecast in the future. But negotiators at the climate summit here seem to have forgotten about water in their endless discussions over forests, carbon trading and finances. Continue Reading

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As World Warms, Southern Africa Swelters

Posted on 07 December 2010 by admin

Irrigation near Kakamas, South Africa: sustainable use of water is especially critical in a warming world. Credit: Patrick Burnett/IPS

By Stephen Leahy

MEXICO CITY, Dec 7, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) Africa will be amongst the hardest hit regions of the world as the climate heats up, threatening the continent’s food security, experts agree. If global temperatures rise 2.0 degrees C, southern Africa will warm an additional 1.5 degrees to a 3.5-degree increase on average. Continue Reading

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Changing Lives – Agriculture in Africa to take the brunt of climate change

Posted on 29 November 2010 by admin

Posted by Tinus de Jager
November 29, 2010

In this Podcast:
- Agriculture researchers want to make their results more practical
- Africa expects a three to four degree rise in temperature
- And using different crops could have positive results

 

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Photos from our Flickr stream

Waves and high tides are eating away at the beaches in Costa Rica’s Cahuita National Park, where the vegetation is uprooted and washed into the sea. Credit: Diego Arguedas/IPSInformal gold mining is the main source of mercury emissions in Latin America. An artisanal gold miner in El Corpus, Choluteca along the Pacific ocean in Honduras. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS.Community leader Olga Vargas and her granddaughter Valery (backs turned to the camera) chat with local residents on one of the hiking paths that the Women’s Association created in the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIn Quebrada Grande, the Agrarian Development Institute dedicated 119 hectares of land to forest conservation, which the Womens’ Association has been looking after for over a decade. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPS
The expansion of pineapple cultivation to the north of the capital San José has put pressure on forests in Costa Rica. There are pineapple plantations and a packing plant right behind the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSOlga Vargas next to the greenhouse with which the Quebrada Grande de Pital Women’s Association began to revitalise its sustainable business, whose priority is reforestation. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIsabel Michi carefully tends seedlings in the greenhouse on her small organic farm in the settlement of Mutirão Eldorado in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: Fabíola Ortiz/IPSVegetation is beginning to cover the dunes separating the sea from the mouth of the  Aguán river. Thanks to the recovery of the dunes, the town is more protected from the wind, and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS

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