Tag Archive | "Colombia"

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Recyclers Tout Benefits of Their Trade

Posted on 06 December 2010 by admin

By Emilio Godoy

CANCÚN, Dec 6, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – Ezequiel Estay began collecting glass bottles in 1991 after losing his job with the Chilean media conglomerate Copesa. Now, years later, he heads Chile’s National Movement of Recyclers and is a leader of the Latin American Recyclers’ Network, which is questioning the climate benefits of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).
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COLOMBIA: Climate Science Reaching Out for Traditional Farmers’ Wisdom

Posted on 02 December 2010 by admin

By Daniela Estrada*

SANTIAGO, Dec 2, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – The wide-ranging knowledge about climate variation possessed by native people and other small farmers, such as the people in one region of Colombia, is almost a perfect match to scientific measurements recorded on high-tech instruments. Continue Reading

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Colombia Tests Forage Crops Against Climate Change

Posted on 25 November 2010 by admin

An experimental grass crop at CIAT's Colombian headquarters. Credit:Neil Palmer/Courtesy of CIAT.

By Constanza Vieira*

BOGOTÁ, Nov 25, 2010 (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – Colombia, with 24 million head of cattle, is showcasing two advances towards reducing the 13 percent of climate-changing gas emissions attributed to livestock production around the world. Continue Reading

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Colombia investiga forrajes contra el cambio climĂĄtico

Posted on 24 November 2010 by admin

Cultivo experimental de brachiaria en la sede colombiana del CIAT.  CrĂ©dito: Neil Palmer – CortesĂ­a CIAT

Cultivo experimental de brachiaria en la sede colombiana del CIAT. CrĂ©dito: Neil Palmer – CortesĂ­a CIAT

Por Constanza Vieira

BOGOTÁ, nov (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – Colombia, con 24 millones de cabezas de ganado, exhibe dos avances para reducir ese 13 por ciento de gases de efecto invernadero que se le achaca a la industria planetaria de rumiantes. Continue Reading

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Photos from our Flickr stream

Waves and high tides are eating away at the beaches in Costa Rica’s Cahuita National Park, where the vegetation is uprooted and washed into the sea. Credit: Diego Arguedas/IPSInformal gold mining is the main source of mercury emissions in Latin America. An artisanal gold miner in El Corpus, Choluteca along the Pacific ocean in Honduras. Credit: Thelma MejĂ­a/IPS.Community leader Olga Vargas and her granddaughter Valery (backs turned to the camera) chat with local residents on one of the hiking paths that the Women’s Association created in the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSThe expansion of pineapple cultivation to the north of the capital San JosĂ© has put pressure on forests in Costa Rica. There are pineapple plantations and a packing plant right behind the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPS
In Quebrada Grande, the Agrarian Development Institute dedicated 119 hectares of land to forest conservation, which the Womens’ Association has been looking after for over a decade. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSOlga Vargas next to the greenhouse with which the Quebrada Grande de Pital Women’s Association began to revitalise its sustainable business, whose priority is reforestation. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIsabel Michi carefully tends seedlings in the greenhouse on her small organic farm in the settlement of Mutirão Eldorado in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: Fabíola Ortiz/IPSVegetation is beginning to cover the dunes separating the sea from the mouth of the  Aguán river. Thanks to the recovery of the dunes, the town is more protected from the wind, and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS

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