Tag Archive | "natural disasters"

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CARIBBEAN: Adapting to Disaster as the New Normal

Posted on 28 November 2010 by admin

The refurbished Tere Yam community shelter in Riviere Cyrique, Dominica is a multi-use facility serving 595 villagers. Credit:Joan Joyce/IPS.

By Zadie Neufville*

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Nov 28, 2010 (IPS/TerraViva) – Residents in the communities around Trinityville in the eastern parish of St. Thomas, Jamaica are used to being stranded for several days at a time. Continue Reading

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The Yin and Yang of Climate Extremes

Posted on 13 October 2010 by admin

A truck left in the wake of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Credit:Susannah Sayler/The Canary Project, Cleveland Museum of Natural History.

By Stephen Leahy*

UXBRIDGE, Canada, Oct 13, 2010 (TierramĂ©rica/TerraViva) – The floods that affected 20 million people in Pakistan and the devastating six- week heat wave in Russia in recent months are tragic climate events — and they’re closely linked. Continue Reading

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Photos from our Flickr stream

Waves and high tides are eating away at the beaches in Costa Rica’s Cahuita National Park, where the vegetation is uprooted and washed into the sea. Credit: Diego Arguedas/IPSInformal gold mining is the main source of mercury emissions in Latin America. An artisanal gold miner in El Corpus, Choluteca along the Pacific ocean in Honduras. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS.Community leader Olga Vargas and her granddaughter Valery (backs turned to the camera) chat with local residents on one of the hiking paths that the Women’s Association created in the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIn Quebrada Grande, the Agrarian Development Institute dedicated 119 hectares of land to forest conservation, which the Womens’ Association has been looking after for over a decade. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPS
The expansion of pineapple cultivation to the north of the capital San José has put pressure on forests in Costa Rica. There are pineapple plantations and a packing plant right behind the Quebrada Grande reserve. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSOlga Vargas next to the greenhouse with which the Quebrada Grande de Pital Women’s Association began to revitalise its sustainable business, whose priority is reforestation. Credit: Diego Arguedas Ortiz/IPSIsabel Michi carefully tends seedlings in the greenhouse on her small organic farm in the settlement of Mutirão Eldorado in the Brazilian state of Rio de Janeiro. Credit: Fabíola Ortiz/IPSVegetation is beginning to cover the dunes separating the sea from the mouth of the  Aguán river. Thanks to the recovery of the dunes, the town is more protected from the wind, and less vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPS

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