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Jazz Album Review: “El Arte del Bolero” – Passionate Homage to the Era of the Bolero – The Arts Fuse
Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death
XYZ Films Takes North American Sales Rights to Travis Taute’s Fantasia Premiere ‘Indemnity’ (EXCLUSIVE)
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Sylvester Stallone Was Almost Cast As Batgirl Movie Villain
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Lupita Nyong’o mourns co-star in powerful tribute
Francesc Garrido, the Robert Mitchum of Gelida
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                    [title] => Jazz Album Review: “El Arte del Bolero” – Passionate Homage to the Era of the Bolero – The Arts Fuse
                    [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/jazz-album-review-el-arte-del-bolero-passionate-homage-to-the-era-of-the-bolero-the-arts-fuse/
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                    [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:31:17 +0000
                    [category] => Movie Production CompaniesAlbumArteArtsBolerodeleraFuseHomageJazzPassionatereview
                    [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1572
                    [description] => By Michael Ullman Miguel Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist. Miguel Zenón and Luis Perdomo, The Art of the Bolero (Honey Music) As I write, it is alto saxophonist and composer Miguel Zenón’s 44th birthday. He’s a MacArthur ... Read more
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By Michael Ullman

Miguel Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist.

Miguel Zenón and Luis Perdomo, The Art of the Bolero (Honey Music)

As I write, it is alto saxophonist and composer Miguel Zenón’s 44th birthday. He’s a MacArthur Fellow, has won a Guggenheim and, more important, has earned the admiration of his peers and a wide listening audience. Often drawn from his Puerto Rican heritage, his repertoire is unique, his writing wide-ranging. He has arranged Puerto Rican songs for orchestra, (on Soul inside) and written for alto saxophone and string quartet (on sonero). He’s a founding member of the SF Jazz Collective and is currently working on a disc dedicated to the music of Ornette Coleman (Law Years: The Music of Ornette Coleman). I think that The Art of the Bolero — its bare-faced duets featuring the saxophonist with his longtime colleague, pianist Luis Perdomo — is in its way just as ambitious as the Coleman homage. When the touching title melody on Alma Adentro: The Puerto Rican Songbook is played, it seems to be reaching for something just out of reach, surrounded by a large orchestra punctuated by drums and cymbals. The large ensemble approach drives Zenón toward ever more effectively impassioned statements. On his new collection, which was recorded as a concert on September 28, Zenón begins “Alma Adentro” on his own and at a slightly slower tempo. He sounds exposed, even when Perdomo comes in quietly behind him.

In his notes to The Art of the Bolero, Zenón explains his affection for “Alma Adentro”: “Sylvia Rexach, the composer of this piece, is a favorite of my mother’s, and I was exposed to her music as a young child. This is a song that always brings back feelings of longing and deep nostalgia, a yearning for things no longer there.”  It seems that Puerto Rican songs, recorded by singers like Rexach, Benny Moré, and Cheo Feliciano, have a special meaning to Zenón and perhaps to his generation. About this recording, he says “we chose compositions from the Bolero era that we could just play right away, without giving it a second thought: songs from the times of our parents and grandparents…. When we play these songs, we can hear the lyrics in the back of our minds — something that provides a very deep connection, one that is hard to replicate in any other situation. It really is almost beyond familiar. These songs are part of us.”

So Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist. His repertoire pushes him and Perdomo in similar directions. The love songs are mostly tragic, the performances impassioned, tender, and virtuosic. “What did I ask of you,” one translation runs, “but loyal understanding,” and in another song a woman wonders how she fell in love with her less loyal mate. “Life is a dream” insists Arsenio Rodriguez’s “La Vida Es un Sueño. The composer, blinded as a child, dramatizes life as a journey of suffering.

Throughout the album, Zenón shows himself to be the master of his instrument. On “Que Te Pedi” (and elsewhere) Zenón begins with an unaccompanied introduction — it comes off as an indirect display piece. There is a pause after the solo opening, And then, accompanied by Perdomo, there is a surprise: the saxophonist almost sings the lyrics of  “Que Te Pedi,”  He hesitates and uses an occasional line-ending vibrato to suggest the vocalist he must be hearing in his head. This is not to say that Zenón is sentimental: he plays with a tart charm, and improvises boldly and zestfully on many of the selections. Perdomo plays with a comparable poeticism and sensitivity to both the song’s words and the possibilities of the chords.

According to Zenón, the session was unrehearsed but the two musicians seem to know exactly what the other is up to.  The opening number on Soul inside, “Juguete,” is the last one on this album, and it is the most playful performance in the lineup. To my ears it is as much as kind of game as it is a dance, with quotes from such songs as “Broadway,” and a chorus in which the pair trade fours and Zenón plays a little of “In Walked Bud.” If you are like me, you’ll leave listening to this album with a song in your head and, if you’re Puerto Rican, perhaps in your heart as well.


Michael Ullman studied classical clarinet and was educated at Harvard, the University of Chicago, and the U. of Michigan, from which he received a PhD in English. The author or co-author of two books on jazz, he has written on jazz and classical music for the Atlantic Monthly, New Republic, High Fidelity, Stereophile, Boston Phoenix, Boston Globe, and other venues. His articles on Dickens, Joyce, Kipling, and others have appeared in academic journals. For over 20 years, he has written a bi-monthly jazz column for Fanfare Magazine, for which he also reviews classical music. At Tufts University, he teaches mostly modernist writers in the English Department and jazz and blues history in the Music Department. He plays piano badly.

We would like to thank the author of this article for this incredible material

Jazz Album Review: “El Arte del Bolero” – Passionate Homage to the Era of the Bolero – The Arts Fuse

) [summary] => By Michael Ullman Miguel Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist. Miguel Zenón and Luis Perdomo, The Art of the Bolero (Honey Music) As I write, it is alto saxophonist and composer Miguel Zenón’s 44th birthday. He’s a MacArthur ... Read more [atom_content] =>

By Michael Ullman

Miguel Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist.

Miguel Zenón and Luis Perdomo, The Art of the Bolero (Honey Music)

As I write, it is alto saxophonist and composer Miguel Zenón’s 44th birthday. He’s a MacArthur Fellow, has won a Guggenheim and, more important, has earned the admiration of his peers and a wide listening audience. Often drawn from his Puerto Rican heritage, his repertoire is unique, his writing wide-ranging. He has arranged Puerto Rican songs for orchestra, (on Soul inside) and written for alto saxophone and string quartet (on sonero). He’s a founding member of the SF Jazz Collective and is currently working on a disc dedicated to the music of Ornette Coleman (Law Years: The Music of Ornette Coleman). I think that The Art of the Bolero — its bare-faced duets featuring the saxophonist with his longtime colleague, pianist Luis Perdomo — is in its way just as ambitious as the Coleman homage. When the touching title melody on Alma Adentro: The Puerto Rican Songbook is played, it seems to be reaching for something just out of reach, surrounded by a large orchestra punctuated by drums and cymbals. The large ensemble approach drives Zenón toward ever more effectively impassioned statements. On his new collection, which was recorded as a concert on September 28, Zenón begins “Alma Adentro” on his own and at a slightly slower tempo. He sounds exposed, even when Perdomo comes in quietly behind him.

In his notes to The Art of the Bolero, Zenón explains his affection for “Alma Adentro”: “Sylvia Rexach, the composer of this piece, is a favorite of my mother’s, and I was exposed to her music as a young child. This is a song that always brings back feelings of longing and deep nostalgia, a yearning for things no longer there.”  It seems that Puerto Rican songs, recorded by singers like Rexach, Benny Moré, and Cheo Feliciano, have a special meaning to Zenón and perhaps to his generation. About this recording, he says “we chose compositions from the Bolero era that we could just play right away, without giving it a second thought: songs from the times of our parents and grandparents…. When we play these songs, we can hear the lyrics in the back of our minds — something that provides a very deep connection, one that is hard to replicate in any other situation. It really is almost beyond familiar. These songs are part of us.”

So Zenón, who on saxophone has the facility of a bebopper, which he uses discreetly, is here a singer as well as an instrumentalist. His repertoire pushes him and Perdomo in similar directions. The love songs are mostly tragic, the performances impassioned, tender, and virtuosic. “What did I ask of you,” one translation runs, “but loyal understanding,” and in another song a woman wonders how she fell in love with her less loyal mate. “Life is a dream” insists Arsenio Rodriguez’s “La Vida Es un Sueño. The composer, blinded as a child, dramatizes life as a journey of suffering.

Throughout the album, Zenón shows himself to be the master of his instrument. On “Que Te Pedi” (and elsewhere) Zenón begins with an unaccompanied introduction — it comes off as an indirect display piece. There is a pause after the solo opening, And then, accompanied by Perdomo, there is a surprise: the saxophonist almost sings the lyrics of  “Que Te Pedi,”  He hesitates and uses an occasional line-ending vibrato to suggest the vocalist he must be hearing in his head. This is not to say that Zenón is sentimental: he plays with a tart charm, and improvises boldly and zestfully on many of the selections. Perdomo plays with a comparable poeticism and sensitivity to both the song’s words and the possibilities of the chords.

According to Zenón, the session was unrehearsed but the two musicians seem to know exactly what the other is up to.  The opening number on Soul inside, “Juguete,” is the last one on this album, and it is the most playful performance in the lineup. To my ears it is as much as kind of game as it is a dance, with quotes from such songs as “Broadway,” and a chorus in which the pair trade fours and Zenón plays a little of “In Walked Bud.” If you are like me, you’ll leave listening to this album with a song in your head and, if you’re Puerto Rican, perhaps in your heart as well.


Michael Ullman studied classical clarinet and was educated at Harvard, the University of Chicago, and the U. of Michigan, from which he received a PhD in English. The author or co-author of two books on jazz, he has written on jazz and classical music for the Atlantic Monthly, New Republic, High Fidelity, Stereophile, Boston Phoenix, Boston Globe, and other venues. His articles on Dickens, Joyce, Kipling, and others have appeared in academic journals. For over 20 years, he has written a bi-monthly jazz column for Fanfare Magazine, for which he also reviews classical music. At Tufts University, he teaches mostly modernist writers in the English Department and jazz and blues history in the Music Department. He plays piano badly.

We would like to thank the author of this article for this incredible material

Jazz Album Review: “El Arte del Bolero” – Passionate Homage to the Era of the Bolero – The Arts Fuse

) [1] => Array ( [title] => Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/black-page-robert-mitchum-the-poker-of-death/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Sally Scully ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:25:57 +0000 [category] => CelebrityBlackdeathMitchumPokerRobert [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1569 [description] => Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death His life was a leaf that the wind dragged from one sewer to another. Spree, marijuana and drunk. He swore he was never an actor and had 100 movies to prove it; for years he wore the same Burberry raincoat and the same dialogues, only the title ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

His life was a leaf that the wind dragged from one sewer to another. Spree, marijuana and drunk. He swore he was never an actor and had 100 movies to prove it; for years he wore the same Burberry raincoat and the same dialogues, only the title of the film and the lead actress changed.

With less education than the dog star Rin-Tin-Tin, he reigned in film noir with his sleepy pimp look and cheap lifesavers, thanks to the lowered eye and crooked nose he won in a boxing match.

It was Commissioner JP Hara, in The Golden , Detective Philip Marlowe, in Bye doll ; the psychopath Max Cady in Cape of Fear or the false preacher Harry Powel, in Hunter’s night . The latter ended it by punching and arguing with director Charles Laughton, upset that the actor drank and used drugs.

In his time, the eunuchs of criticism called him inexpressive, laconic and having only two interpretive registers: with horse or without horse. Robert Charles Durman Mitchum never argued with them; as I said: “My difference with other actors is that they have spent less time in jail than me.”

He also didn’t lie about that because at age 14 he fled his native Bridgeport, Connecticut, and hopped on a freight train. He traveled all over the United States jumping from wagon to wagon.

Police caught him in Savannah, Georgia, and dumped his bones in prison; They accused him of vagrancy and spent several weeks in chains with several inmates, but managed to escape and returned to his mother, Ann Gunderson.

While Robert was brooding his next adventures, he met and fell in love with Dorothy Spence; At 23 they married and lived together for 67 years.

Unable to resist the call of the street, he boarded another railroad; He led the life of a rebellious young man, unstable and without destiny.

He did what he could to half eat: miner, gravedigger, dishwasher, laborer, gigolo in a bar of evil living beings; he cleaned ship decks on all fours, was an assistant to an astrologer and became a boxer. He fought in 27 fights and left the ring, because a beating left him feeling sleepy and lost.

At the requests of his sister Julie, he settled in California, there he got a permanent job as an usher in a movie theater and later in an amateur theater. During the day he worked in an airplane factory and quit because the stress almost left him blind.

Whether by chance, necessity or looking for women, he got into the movies and became an actor. He never had a vocation for it and, according to Robert, he always followed the Rin-Tin-Tin method: “He never cares about motivation, concepts and all that rubbish.”

Lonely Star

He was descended from an Irish family; He had a hard childhood and a difficult youth due to his character as a thug. They gave birth to him in Connecticut on August 6, 1917, and when he was two years old, his father – James Thomas – was killed by a train in Charleston, South Carolina.

The mother, Ann, married Lt. Hugh Cunningham Morris and they raised Julie, John, and Carole. When the children grew up she worked as a linotype designer.

From a young age Robert was a joker and a brawler; to keep him away from fights and mischief, Ann sent him to live with his grandparents in Delaware. He barely lasted a few months at school; they expelled him for using the director’s hat as a latrine. Despite this, he was a restless, intelligent boy and a voracious reader.

The days of the Great Depression were spent wandering around different states, like thousands of unemployed. This is how he spent his youth, until at age 25 a talent scout convinced him to try his luck at a theater in Long Beach, California.

His colossal physique, rude manners, deep voice, and sullen face made a place for him in role-playing roles, where he spoke with his fists or weapons.

He stopped the Hollywood peddlers in their tracks, who tried to change his last name Mitchum to a more “artistic” one; he refused because it was a tribute to the father he never knew.

In 1943 he performed for the first time in Hopalong Cassidy , a series of cowboy movies. Charged $ 100 per week and per War and memories , from 1988, they paid him a million dollars.

From 1946 to 1957, he played ruffians, soldiers, private detectives, vagabonds and antiheroes with high doses of cynicism, the same one he displayed in his private life.

The police arrested him in 1948 – with his friend Lila Leeds – for drug possession and he spent two months locked up. Magazine Life He photographed him in a prison suit and sweeping the floor of the prison.

Thanks to magnate Howard Hughes he returned to the stage. The public adored him for his lack of glamour , and did not stop working, smoking weed, drinking and women until the day of his death, July 1, 1997, at the age of 79.

He was never a star, because he did not like being taken over by his cold and distant appearance, or his dry, hard, angular face with a dimple on his chin. Lacking acting talent, he played himself, memorized his lines, and acted like a movie animal.

Robert Mitchum was never taken seriously, never listened to, despised the hypocritical environment of Hollywood and acknowledged that “Everything that has been written about me is true.”

He was always a wanderer. He died as he lived: without regret and without remorse.

We would like to give thanks to the writer of this write-up for this outstanding web content

Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death

) [summary] => Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death His life was a leaf that the wind dragged from one sewer to another. Spree, marijuana and drunk. He swore he was never an actor and had 100 movies to prove it; for years he wore the same Burberry raincoat and the same dialogues, only the title ... Read more [atom_content] =>

His life was a leaf that the wind dragged from one sewer to another. Spree, marijuana and drunk. He swore he was never an actor and had 100 movies to prove it; for years he wore the same Burberry raincoat and the same dialogues, only the title of the film and the lead actress changed.

With less education than the dog star Rin-Tin-Tin, he reigned in film noir with his sleepy pimp look and cheap lifesavers, thanks to the lowered eye and crooked nose he won in a boxing match.

It was Commissioner JP Hara, in The Golden , Detective Philip Marlowe, in Bye doll ; the psychopath Max Cady in Cape of Fear or the false preacher Harry Powel, in Hunter’s night . The latter ended it by punching and arguing with director Charles Laughton, upset that the actor drank and used drugs.

In his time, the eunuchs of criticism called him inexpressive, laconic and having only two interpretive registers: with horse or without horse. Robert Charles Durman Mitchum never argued with them; as I said: “My difference with other actors is that they have spent less time in jail than me.”

He also didn’t lie about that because at age 14 he fled his native Bridgeport, Connecticut, and hopped on a freight train. He traveled all over the United States jumping from wagon to wagon.

Police caught him in Savannah, Georgia, and dumped his bones in prison; They accused him of vagrancy and spent several weeks in chains with several inmates, but managed to escape and returned to his mother, Ann Gunderson.

While Robert was brooding his next adventures, he met and fell in love with Dorothy Spence; At 23 they married and lived together for 67 years.

Unable to resist the call of the street, he boarded another railroad; He led the life of a rebellious young man, unstable and without destiny.

He did what he could to half eat: miner, gravedigger, dishwasher, laborer, gigolo in a bar of evil living beings; he cleaned ship decks on all fours, was an assistant to an astrologer and became a boxer. He fought in 27 fights and left the ring, because a beating left him feeling sleepy and lost.

At the requests of his sister Julie, he settled in California, there he got a permanent job as an usher in a movie theater and later in an amateur theater. During the day he worked in an airplane factory and quit because the stress almost left him blind.

Whether by chance, necessity or looking for women, he got into the movies and became an actor. He never had a vocation for it and, according to Robert, he always followed the Rin-Tin-Tin method: “He never cares about motivation, concepts and all that rubbish.”

Lonely Star

He was descended from an Irish family; He had a hard childhood and a difficult youth due to his character as a thug. They gave birth to him in Connecticut on August 6, 1917, and when he was two years old, his father – James Thomas – was killed by a train in Charleston, South Carolina.

The mother, Ann, married Lt. Hugh Cunningham Morris and they raised Julie, John, and Carole. When the children grew up she worked as a linotype designer.

From a young age Robert was a joker and a brawler; to keep him away from fights and mischief, Ann sent him to live with his grandparents in Delaware. He barely lasted a few months at school; they expelled him for using the director’s hat as a latrine. Despite this, he was a restless, intelligent boy and a voracious reader.

The days of the Great Depression were spent wandering around different states, like thousands of unemployed. This is how he spent his youth, until at age 25 a talent scout convinced him to try his luck at a theater in Long Beach, California.

His colossal physique, rude manners, deep voice, and sullen face made a place for him in role-playing roles, where he spoke with his fists or weapons.

He stopped the Hollywood peddlers in their tracks, who tried to change his last name Mitchum to a more “artistic” one; he refused because it was a tribute to the father he never knew.

In 1943 he performed for the first time in Hopalong Cassidy , a series of cowboy movies. Charged $ 100 per week and per War and memories , from 1988, they paid him a million dollars.

From 1946 to 1957, he played ruffians, soldiers, private detectives, vagabonds and antiheroes with high doses of cynicism, the same one he displayed in his private life.

The police arrested him in 1948 – with his friend Lila Leeds – for drug possession and he spent two months locked up. Magazine Life He photographed him in a prison suit and sweeping the floor of the prison.

Thanks to magnate Howard Hughes he returned to the stage. The public adored him for his lack of glamour , and did not stop working, smoking weed, drinking and women until the day of his death, July 1, 1997, at the age of 79.

He was never a star, because he did not like being taken over by his cold and distant appearance, or his dry, hard, angular face with a dimple on his chin. Lacking acting talent, he played himself, memorized his lines, and acted like a movie animal.

Robert Mitchum was never taken seriously, never listened to, despised the hypocritical environment of Hollywood and acknowledged that “Everything that has been written about me is true.”

He was always a wanderer. He died as he lived: without regret and without remorse.

We would like to give thanks to the writer of this write-up for this outstanding web content

Black Page Robert Mitchum: The Poker of Death

) [2] => Array ( [title] => XYZ Films Takes North American Sales Rights to Travis Taute’s Fantasia Premiere ‘Indemnity’ (EXCLUSIVE) [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/xyz-films-takes-north-american-sales-rights-to-travis-tautes-fantasia-premiere-indemnity-exclusive/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Sally Scully ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:23:50 +0000 [category] => Movie Production CompaniesAmericanEXCLUSIVEFantasiaFilmsIndemnityNorthpremiereRightsSalesTakesTautesTravisXYZ [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1566 [description] => XYZ Films has acquired North American sales rights to “Indemnity,” an action thriller from South African director Travis Taute that’s set to world premiere at Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival. Written and directed by Taute, “Indemnity” tells the story of an ex-firefighter in Cape Town who’s forced to fight for his life after being accused of ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

XYZ Films has acquired North American sales rights to “Indemnity,” an action thriller from South African director Travis Taute that’s set to world premiere at Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival.

Written and directed by Taute, “Indemnity” tells the story of an ex-firefighter in Cape Town who’s forced to fight for his life after being accused of murdering his wife. Starring Jarrid Geduld, Nicole Fortuin and Andre Jacobs, pic is produced by Benjamin Overmeyer and Bradley Joshua for Gambit Films, the South African production outfit behind the Netflix series “Blood and Water” and the Fantasia prize winner “Number 37.”

“‘Indemnity’ is, at its very core, a simple and poetic journey of one man’s attempt at redemption in the wake of a devastating trauma,” said Taute. “It was conceived as a vehicle to shine a spotlight on the importance of mental health and deliver sobering insight into the destructive nature of toxic masculinity.”

The film follows Theo Abrams, a former firefighter from Cape Town suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder who wakes up one morning beside his wife’s dead body. With no memory of what transpired and all evidence pointing to him as the murderer, Abrams sets out to prove his innocence, uncovering proof along the way of a global conspiracy that not only threatens his life but could change the course of the nation forever.

“It was important for me to demonstrate, through Theo’s journey, the ability of the human spirit to endure and survive unimaginable tragedy,” said Taute. “To paint an intimate portrait of one man’s psychological struggle against the backdrop of a thrilling, investigative plot that sees him traverse across a contemporary Cape Town landscape in a relentless, pulse-pounding pursuit of the truth.”

The writer-director called his feature debut a “love letter” to some of his favorite genre films of the ‘90s and ‘00s, such as “The Fugitive” and “Enemy of the State,” which he described as “highly entertaining action vehicles that were driven by character and not spectacle, grounded in realism and embedded with topical social commentary that made them really resonate.”

“Inspired by these classics, our ambition as filmmakers at Gambit Films was really to change the perception on the kinds of genre films that can be produced in South Africa,” Taute continued, “and through ‘Indemnity,’ to demonstrate our ability to tell a highly entertaining and engaging genre story, with universally relatable themes that we hope audiences will come to really resonate with.”

XYZ Films previously repped “Number 37,” the buzzy feature debut of director Nosipho Dumisa, which premiered at SXSW before winning the best director award at Fantasia in 2018. The film was picked up by Dark Star Pictures for a North American theatrical release.

“XYZ Films is beyond thrilled to continue our collaboration with Gambit Films and present ‘Indemnity’ to the North American market,” said Pip Ngo, the company’s VP of sales and acquisitions. “Travis has directed an intelligent, adrenaline-fueled thriller that showcases the best of what South Africa has to offer in the action genre today.”

Gambit’s Joshua described “Indemnity” as “the biggest action film to come out of this region that has originated and been produced completely here,” adding: “We feel that with this film, we are moving the genre needle for films coming out of Africa and South Africa.”

The Fantasia Film Festival runs Aug. 5-25.

We want to say thanks to the author of this write-up for this outstanding content

XYZ Films Takes North American Sales Rights to Travis Taute’s Fantasia Premiere ‘Indemnity’ (EXCLUSIVE)

) [summary] => XYZ Films has acquired North American sales rights to “Indemnity,” an action thriller from South African director Travis Taute that’s set to world premiere at Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival. Written and directed by Taute, “Indemnity” tells the story of an ex-firefighter in Cape Town who’s forced to fight for his life after being accused of ... Read more [atom_content] =>

XYZ Films has acquired North American sales rights to “Indemnity,” an action thriller from South African director Travis Taute that’s set to world premiere at Montreal’s Fantasia Film Festival.

Written and directed by Taute, “Indemnity” tells the story of an ex-firefighter in Cape Town who’s forced to fight for his life after being accused of murdering his wife. Starring Jarrid Geduld, Nicole Fortuin and Andre Jacobs, pic is produced by Benjamin Overmeyer and Bradley Joshua for Gambit Films, the South African production outfit behind the Netflix series “Blood and Water” and the Fantasia prize winner “Number 37.”

“‘Indemnity’ is, at its very core, a simple and poetic journey of one man’s attempt at redemption in the wake of a devastating trauma,” said Taute. “It was conceived as a vehicle to shine a spotlight on the importance of mental health and deliver sobering insight into the destructive nature of toxic masculinity.”

The film follows Theo Abrams, a former firefighter from Cape Town suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder who wakes up one morning beside his wife’s dead body. With no memory of what transpired and all evidence pointing to him as the murderer, Abrams sets out to prove his innocence, uncovering proof along the way of a global conspiracy that not only threatens his life but could change the course of the nation forever.

“It was important for me to demonstrate, through Theo’s journey, the ability of the human spirit to endure and survive unimaginable tragedy,” said Taute. “To paint an intimate portrait of one man’s psychological struggle against the backdrop of a thrilling, investigative plot that sees him traverse across a contemporary Cape Town landscape in a relentless, pulse-pounding pursuit of the truth.”

The writer-director called his feature debut a “love letter” to some of his favorite genre films of the ‘90s and ‘00s, such as “The Fugitive” and “Enemy of the State,” which he described as “highly entertaining action vehicles that were driven by character and not spectacle, grounded in realism and embedded with topical social commentary that made them really resonate.”

“Inspired by these classics, our ambition as filmmakers at Gambit Films was really to change the perception on the kinds of genre films that can be produced in South Africa,” Taute continued, “and through ‘Indemnity,’ to demonstrate our ability to tell a highly entertaining and engaging genre story, with universally relatable themes that we hope audiences will come to really resonate with.”

XYZ Films previously repped “Number 37,” the buzzy feature debut of director Nosipho Dumisa, which premiered at SXSW before winning the best director award at Fantasia in 2018. The film was picked up by Dark Star Pictures for a North American theatrical release.

“XYZ Films is beyond thrilled to continue our collaboration with Gambit Films and present ‘Indemnity’ to the North American market,” said Pip Ngo, the company’s VP of sales and acquisitions. “Travis has directed an intelligent, adrenaline-fueled thriller that showcases the best of what South Africa has to offer in the action genre today.”

Gambit’s Joshua described “Indemnity” as “the biggest action film to come out of this region that has originated and been produced completely here,” adding: “We feel that with this film, we are moving the genre needle for films coming out of Africa and South Africa.”

The Fantasia Film Festival runs Aug. 5-25.

We want to say thanks to the author of this write-up for this outstanding content

XYZ Films Takes North American Sales Rights to Travis Taute’s Fantasia Premiere ‘Indemnity’ (EXCLUSIVE)

) [3] => Array ( [title] => James Packer has sold his stake in Hollywood film company RatPac Entertainment [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/james-packer-has-sold-his-stake-in-hollywood-film-company-ratpac-entertainment/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Sally Scully ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:23:03 +0000 [category] => Movie Production CompaniesCompanyEntertainmentFilmHollywoodJamesPackerRatPacsoldStake [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1563 [description] => James Packer. Photo: Scott Barbour/ Getty Images. Australian billionaire James Packer has sold off his share in RatPac Entertainment, the film business he co-founded with Hollywood producer and director, Brett Ratner, four years ago. Britain’s second richest person, Ukraine-born American billionaire Len Blavatnik, bought Packer’s stake, which Variety first reported the casino mogul had been ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

James Packer. Photo: Scott Barbour/ Getty Images.

Australian billionaire James Packer has sold off his share in RatPac Entertainment, the film business he co-founded with Hollywood producer and director, Brett Ratner, four years ago.

Britain’s second richest person, Ukraine-born American billionaire Len Blavatnik, bought Packer’s stake, which Variety first reported the casino mogul had been looking to sell in February, despite denials from the company.

Blavatnik’s company, Access Entertainment, is now Ratner’s partner in RatPac, and the co-founder stays on as CEO.

Access Entertainment president Danny Cohen, a former director of BBC TV, will become co-chairman alongside Ratner.

The deal gives Access ownership of RatPac’s film, television and documentary business, along with a major piece of the RatPac-Dune venture that co-finances up to 75 films for Warner Bros.

Access Entertainment was launched in May 2016, and has invested in a premium scripted television financing venture with BBC Worldwide/Lookout Point, a 25% stake in international television business Bad Wolf and a film slate deal with House Productions.

Brett Ratner, CEO, RatPac Entertainment, said: “I am thrilled to be in partnership with Len and Danny. Len and I have shared the same vision and passion for movies, television and music over the years. Because of his experience and enthusiasm, RatPac Entertainment will be an even more formidable provider of quality entertainment worldwide.”

Blavatnik said: “I am delighted to be partnering with [Warner Bros CEO] Kevin Tsujihara and the studio alongside the unique talent of Brett Ratner. Together we will build on RatPac’s strategic partnership with Warner Bros.”

Tsujihara paid tribute to Packer and his company’s track record since the co-financing deal began.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship with Brett and RatPac and look forward to working with Len, Danny and the entire Access team,” he said.

“I’d also like to thank James – he’s been a terrific partner the last three years, having worked with us on a number of key films, including Batman v Superman, Suicide Squad and The LEGO Batman Movie.”

Founded in 2013 by Ratner and Packer, RatPac co-financed 67 theatrically released films taking more than $10 billion in worldwide box office receipts.

They were nominated for 52 Academy Awards, 39 BAFTAs, 23 Golden Globes, five Emmys and eight AFI awards, winning 22 Oscars, 17 BAFTAs, seven Golden Globes and three AFI awards.

The Ratpac-Dune deal included Gravity, The LEGO Movie, Annabelle, American Sniper, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, The Conjuring 2, Lights Out, Suicide Squad, The LEGO Batman Movie, Kong: Skull Island and the upcoming Wonder Woman, Justice League and Stephen King’s It. RatPac has also partnered with New Regency on films including the Oscar-winning Birdman and The Revenant.

In January this year, 18 months after he’d quit as chairman of Crown Resorts, Packer decided to rejoin the board amid a major management and board shakeup, including CEO Rowen Craigie leaving after 24 years in the business, while long-time lieutenant John Alexander became chairman and CEO.

But the downturn in high rollers saw Crown post a normalised net profit after tax of $191.3 million, down 9.1%, in February.

The company, 48.2% owned by Packer through his private company Consolidated Press Holdings (CPH), also sold down its stake in Melco Crown Entertainment, the troubled Macau gaming joint venture with Lawrence Ho, the son of gambling pioneer Stanley Ho. Crown’s shareholding was reduced from 27.4% to 14% in a deal bringing in $1.6 billion to cut debt and return funds to shareholders.

We would like to give thanks to the author of this post for this awesome material

James Packer has sold his stake in Hollywood film company RatPac Entertainment

) [summary] => James Packer. Photo: Scott Barbour/ Getty Images. Australian billionaire James Packer has sold off his share in RatPac Entertainment, the film business he co-founded with Hollywood producer and director, Brett Ratner, four years ago. Britain’s second richest person, Ukraine-born American billionaire Len Blavatnik, bought Packer’s stake, which Variety first reported the casino mogul had been ... Read more [atom_content] =>

James Packer. Photo: Scott Barbour/ Getty Images.

Australian billionaire James Packer has sold off his share in RatPac Entertainment, the film business he co-founded with Hollywood producer and director, Brett Ratner, four years ago.

Britain’s second richest person, Ukraine-born American billionaire Len Blavatnik, bought Packer’s stake, which Variety first reported the casino mogul had been looking to sell in February, despite denials from the company.

Blavatnik’s company, Access Entertainment, is now Ratner’s partner in RatPac, and the co-founder stays on as CEO.

Access Entertainment president Danny Cohen, a former director of BBC TV, will become co-chairman alongside Ratner.

The deal gives Access ownership of RatPac’s film, television and documentary business, along with a major piece of the RatPac-Dune venture that co-finances up to 75 films for Warner Bros.

Access Entertainment was launched in May 2016, and has invested in a premium scripted television financing venture with BBC Worldwide/Lookout Point, a 25% stake in international television business Bad Wolf and a film slate deal with House Productions.

Brett Ratner, CEO, RatPac Entertainment, said: “I am thrilled to be in partnership with Len and Danny. Len and I have shared the same vision and passion for movies, television and music over the years. Because of his experience and enthusiasm, RatPac Entertainment will be an even more formidable provider of quality entertainment worldwide.”

Blavatnik said: “I am delighted to be partnering with [Warner Bros CEO] Kevin Tsujihara and the studio alongside the unique talent of Brett Ratner. Together we will build on RatPac’s strategic partnership with Warner Bros.”

Tsujihara paid tribute to Packer and his company’s track record since the co-financing deal began.

“We’re excited to continue our relationship with Brett and RatPac and look forward to working with Len, Danny and the entire Access team,” he said.

“I’d also like to thank James – he’s been a terrific partner the last three years, having worked with us on a number of key films, including Batman v Superman, Suicide Squad and The LEGO Batman Movie.”

Founded in 2013 by Ratner and Packer, RatPac co-financed 67 theatrically released films taking more than $10 billion in worldwide box office receipts.

They were nominated for 52 Academy Awards, 39 BAFTAs, 23 Golden Globes, five Emmys and eight AFI awards, winning 22 Oscars, 17 BAFTAs, seven Golden Globes and three AFI awards.

The Ratpac-Dune deal included Gravity, The LEGO Movie, Annabelle, American Sniper, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, The Conjuring 2, Lights Out, Suicide Squad, The LEGO Batman Movie, Kong: Skull Island and the upcoming Wonder Woman, Justice League and Stephen King’s It. RatPac has also partnered with New Regency on films including the Oscar-winning Birdman and The Revenant.

In January this year, 18 months after he’d quit as chairman of Crown Resorts, Packer decided to rejoin the board amid a major management and board shakeup, including CEO Rowen Craigie leaving after 24 years in the business, while long-time lieutenant John Alexander became chairman and CEO.

But the downturn in high rollers saw Crown post a normalised net profit after tax of $191.3 million, down 9.1%, in February.

The company, 48.2% owned by Packer through his private company Consolidated Press Holdings (CPH), also sold down its stake in Melco Crown Entertainment, the troubled Macau gaming joint venture with Lawrence Ho, the son of gambling pioneer Stanley Ho. Crown’s shareholding was reduced from 27.4% to 14% in a deal bringing in $1.6 billion to cut debt and return funds to shareholders.

We would like to give thanks to the author of this post for this awesome material

James Packer has sold his stake in Hollywood film company RatPac Entertainment

) [4] => Array ( [title] => Sylvester Stallone Was Almost Cast As Batgirl Movie Villain [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/sylvester-stallone-was-almost-cast-as-batgirl-movie-villain/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Pauline Moonlky ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:20:16 +0000 [category] => Trending PeopleBatgirlCastMovieStalloneSylvesterVillain [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1560 [description] => A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DCEU. A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DC Extended Universe. A film revolving around the titular crime fighter has ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DCEU.

A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DC Extended Universe. A film revolving around the titular crime fighter has been in the works since 2017 when Justice League reshoot helmer Joss Whedon was attached to write and direct the project, though he would drop out just a year later. Warner Bros. and DC Films wouldn’t sit on their hands for long as they turned their attention to Birds of Prey scribe Christina Hodson to pen the script after impressing the studios with her work on the Harley Quinn spin-off film.


After a couple of years of Hodson being busy writing the script for the DCEU’s The Flash, WB would get the wheels rolling on Batgirl again earlier this year as Bad Boys for Life duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah signed on to direct the film at HBO Max in May. Casting would get underway shortly thereafter, with In the Heights star Leslie Grace landing the coveted titular role while J.K. Simmons entered talks to reprise his role as Gotham City Police Commissioner Jim Gordon, Batgirl’s father, from Justice League and Jacob Scipio signing on to star in an undisclosed role. Batgirl‘s roster recently expanded with the addition of Doom Patrol‘s Brendan Fraser as the villainous Firefly, though it now appears he wasn’t the first actor in mind for the part.

Related: How HBO Max Is Setting Up A Better Birds of Prey Movie

On the heels of Fraser being cast in the part, The Hollywood Reporter‘s Borys Kit took to Twitter to reveal Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly in the Batgirl movie. Kit reveals that the Rocky and Rambo star was first offered the part of the main antagonist though a deal couldn’t be struck between Stallone and the studio. See what Kit revealed below:

Click here to see the original post

The addition of Brendan Fraser as Firefly sent a wave of excitement through social media, with fans eager to see his recent streak of high profile roles continue with Batgirl. It also came as an intriguing one given his role in HBO Max’s Doom Patrol as Cliff Steele/Robotman, a show that may not technically be connected to the mainline DCEU but has crossed universes multiple time. The thought of Stallone in the part would have created a similar point of curiosity amongst audiences given his recent turn as King Shark in James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad, which does sit as a proper chapter in the cinematic universe.

Even if Stallone isn’t going to portray Firefly for HBO Max’s Batgirl, his future in the world of comic book adaptations is still looking bright. The film adaptation of Bragi F. Schut, Marc-Oliver Frisch, and Renzo Podesta’s graphic novel series Samaritan is currently in post-production and set for a Summer 2022 release while rumors swirl about his potential return for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, Gunn’s final chapter in his Marvel Cinematic Universe trilogy. In the meantime, audiences can look forward to Fraser’s portrayal of Firefly hitting HBO Max sometime in 2022.

More: Every DC Movie Update & Trailer From FanDome 2021

Source: Borys Kit/Twitter

  • The Batman (2022)Release date: Mar 04, 2022
  • Black Adam (2022)Release date: Jul 29, 2022
  • The Flash (2022)Release date: Nov 04, 2022
  • Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom (2022)Release date: Dec 16, 2022
  • Shazam! Fury of the Gods (2023)Release date: Jun 02, 2023

Dune: What Is Baron Harkonnen’s Creepy Pet? Every Theory


About The Author

We want to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this amazing content

Sylvester Stallone Was Almost Cast As Batgirl Movie Villain

) [summary] => A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DCEU. A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DC Extended Universe. A film revolving around the titular crime fighter has ... Read more [atom_content] =>

A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DCEU.

A new report reveals that Sylvester Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly, the pyromaniac main antagonist of the Batgirl movie in the DC Extended Universe. A film revolving around the titular crime fighter has been in the works since 2017 when Justice League reshoot helmer Joss Whedon was attached to write and direct the project, though he would drop out just a year later. Warner Bros. and DC Films wouldn’t sit on their hands for long as they turned their attention to Birds of Prey scribe Christina Hodson to pen the script after impressing the studios with her work on the Harley Quinn spin-off film.


After a couple of years of Hodson being busy writing the script for the DCEU’s The Flash, WB would get the wheels rolling on Batgirl again earlier this year as Bad Boys for Life duo Adil El Arbi and Bilall Fallah signed on to direct the film at HBO Max in May. Casting would get underway shortly thereafter, with In the Heights star Leslie Grace landing the coveted titular role while J.K. Simmons entered talks to reprise his role as Gotham City Police Commissioner Jim Gordon, Batgirl’s father, from Justice League and Jacob Scipio signing on to star in an undisclosed role. Batgirl‘s roster recently expanded with the addition of Doom Patrol‘s Brendan Fraser as the villainous Firefly, though it now appears he wasn’t the first actor in mind for the part.

Related: How HBO Max Is Setting Up A Better Birds of Prey Movie

On the heels of Fraser being cast in the part, The Hollywood Reporter‘s Borys Kit took to Twitter to reveal Stallone was nearly cast as Firefly in the Batgirl movie. Kit reveals that the Rocky and Rambo star was first offered the part of the main antagonist though a deal couldn’t be struck between Stallone and the studio. See what Kit revealed below:

Click here to see the original post

The addition of Brendan Fraser as Firefly sent a wave of excitement through social media, with fans eager to see his recent streak of high profile roles continue with Batgirl. It also came as an intriguing one given his role in HBO Max’s Doom Patrol as Cliff Steele/Robotman, a show that may not technically be connected to the mainline DCEU but has crossed universes multiple time. The thought of Stallone in the part would have created a similar point of curiosity amongst audiences given his recent turn as King Shark in James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad, which does sit as a proper chapter in the cinematic universe.

Even if Stallone isn’t going to portray Firefly for HBO Max’s Batgirl, his future in the world of comic book adaptations is still looking bright. The film adaptation of Bragi F. Schut, Marc-Oliver Frisch, and Renzo Podesta’s graphic novel series Samaritan is currently in post-production and set for a Summer 2022 release while rumors swirl about his potential return for Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3, Gunn’s final chapter in his Marvel Cinematic Universe trilogy. In the meantime, audiences can look forward to Fraser’s portrayal of Firefly hitting HBO Max sometime in 2022.

More: Every DC Movie Update & Trailer From FanDome 2021

Source: Borys Kit/Twitter

  • The Batman (2022)Release date: Mar 04, 2022
  • Black Adam (2022)Release date: Jul 29, 2022
  • The Flash (2022)Release date: Nov 04, 2022
  • Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom (2022)Release date: Dec 16, 2022
  • Shazam! Fury of the Gods (2023)Release date: Jun 02, 2023

Dune: What Is Baron Harkonnen’s Creepy Pet? Every Theory


About The Author

We want to say thanks to the writer of this short article for this amazing content

Sylvester Stallone Was Almost Cast As Batgirl Movie Villain

) [5] => Array ( [title] => Harrison Ford Once Asked Adam Sandler to Wash His Car for a Hilarious Reason [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/harrison-ford-once-asked-adam-sandler-to-wash-his-car-for-a-hilarious-reason/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Pauline Moonlky ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:13:45 +0000 [category] => Trending PeopleAdamCarFordHarrisonHilariousReasonSandlerWash [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1557 [description] => Adam Sandler once shared the hilarious story of how Hollywood icon Harrison Ford asked Sandler to wash his car. Sandler was at a party at Carrie Fisher’s house back in the day when Ford recognized the up-and-comer and invited the young SNL star to his house. Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston | David Livingston/Getty Images ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Adam Sandler once shared the hilarious story of how Hollywood icon Harrison Ford asked Sandler to wash his car. Sandler was at a party at Carrie Fisher’s house back in the day when Ford recognized the up-and-comer and invited the young SNL star to his house.

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston | David Livingston/Getty Images

Adam Sandler shared the details of Harrison Ford’s strange invitation

During a 2017 interview on Conan, host Conan O’Brien chatted with Sandler about working with Fisher, who punched up the script for The Wedding Singer. That prompted the funnyman to tell the story of Ford’s bizarre invitation.

We would love to say thanks to the writer of this write-up for this outstanding material

Harrison Ford Once Asked Adam Sandler to Wash His Car for a Hilarious Reason

) [summary] => Adam Sandler once shared the hilarious story of how Hollywood icon Harrison Ford asked Sandler to wash his car. Sandler was at a party at Carrie Fisher’s house back in the day when Ford recognized the up-and-comer and invited the young SNL star to his house. Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston | David Livingston/Getty Images ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Adam Sandler once shared the hilarious story of how Hollywood icon Harrison Ford asked Sandler to wash his car. Sandler was at a party at Carrie Fisher’s house back in the day when Ford recognized the up-and-comer and invited the young SNL star to his house.

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston | David Livingston/Getty Images

Adam Sandler shared the details of Harrison Ford’s strange invitation

During a 2017 interview on Conan, host Conan O’Brien chatted with Sandler about working with Fisher, who punched up the script for The Wedding Singer. That prompted the funnyman to tell the story of Ford’s bizarre invitation.

We would love to say thanks to the writer of this write-up for this outstanding material

Harrison Ford Once Asked Adam Sandler to Wash His Car for a Hilarious Reason

) [6] => Array ( [title] => BBC Studios Germany Kicks Off With ‘Miranda’ Adaptation for ZDF Neo – Global Bulletin [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/bbc-studios-germany-kicks-off-with-miranda-adaptation-for-zdf-neo-global-bulletin/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Sally Scully ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 16:10:36 +0000 [category] => Movie Production CompaniesAdaptationBBCBulletinGermanyglobalkicksMirandaNeoStudiosZDF [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1554 [description] => PRODUCTION BBC Studios Germany has secured its first commission since launching in the territory this year — a local adaptation of British sitcom “Miranda” — and is co-producing the eight-part series for ZDF Neo with Studio central. “Miranda,” a BBC production written by and starring Miranda Hart, will be adapted for a German audience with ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

PRODUCTION

BBC Studios Germany has secured its first commission since launching in the territory this year — a local adaptation of British sitcom “Miranda” — and is co-producing the eight-part series for ZDF Neo with Studio central.

“Miranda,” a BBC production written by and starring Miranda Hart, will be adapted for a German audience with the working title “Ruby” and will be directed by Natascha Beller (“Advent, Advent”). The screenplay is being adapted by Giulia Becker (“Kroymann”) and Anika Soisson (“Findher”) and Anna Böger (“Tatort”) plays the lead role of Ruby. Filming is currently taking place in Cologne.

The show sees Ruby facing the challenges of everyday life in a slightly clumsy way. The cast also includes Irene Rindje and Camill Jammal.

“Miranda” was previously adapted for the U.S. as “Call me Kat,” starring Mayim Bialik (“The Big Bang Theory”), by Fox Television, where it has been renewed for a second season.

BBC Studios Germany also co-produces “The Great Bake Off” with Tower Productions and the RTL version of “Strictly Come Dancing,” titled “Let’s Dance,” with Seapoint Productions.

Conleth Hill, Siobhan McSweeney – “Holding”
Conor Horgan/ITV

CASTING

Oscar winning actor Brenda Fricker (“My Left Foot”), Siobhán McSweeney (“Nowhere Special”), Charlene McKenna (“Bloodlands”), Helen Behan (“The Virtues”) and Pauline McLynn (“Father Ted”) have been cast alongside Conleth Hill (“Game of Thrones”) in U.K. broadcaster ITV’s four-part adaptation of popular chat show host Graham Norton’s bestselling novel “Holding.”

Set in the insular fictional village of Duneen, West Cork, on the edge of Ireland, the series is directed by Kathy Burke (Lady Windermere’s Fan”), written by Dominic Treadwell-Collins (“Family Affairs”) and Karen Cogan (“The Young Offenders”) and produced by Happy Prince and Port Pictures in association with Screen Ireland and co-produced by Virgin Media Television.

The cast also includes Clinton Liberty (“Normal People”), Amy Conroy (“The South Westerlies”), Olwen Fouéré (“Beast”), Eleanor Tiernan (“Bridget and Eamon”), Gary Shelford (“Belgravia”), Lochlann Ó’Meárain (“Smother”), Sky Yang (“Halo”), Demi Issac Oviawe (“The Young Offenders”), Norma Sheahan (“Bridget and Eamon”), and Anne Kent (“Fair City”) .

Hill plays a local police officer who is tasked with solving a serious crime for the first time in his career while McSweeney and McKenna are suspects in the case. Fricker plays a shy presence in Hill’s life who has been battling her own demons and secrets.

ITV’s head of drama, Polly Hill commissioned the series, filming on which is underway at West Cork locations.

Lazy loaded image

“MasterChef Telugu”
Banijay

VERSIONS

Banijay has commissioned four seasons of MasterChef in India in the Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada languages, hosted by hugely popular film stars from those industries.

Vijay Sethupathi (“Master”) will host the Tamil version, Tamannaah Bhatia (“Baahubali”) Telugu, Prithviraj Sukumaran (“Cold Case”) Malayalam and Kichcha Sudeep (“Pailwaan”) Kannada.

All four seasons will be produced by Endemol Shine India for Innovative Film Academy and will air on the Sun Network later this year.

Created by Franc Roddam, “MasterChef” is the world’s most successful cookery television format, produced across 62 markets, with more than 10,000 episodes broadcast. The format is represented internationally by Banijay Rights.

We would love to say thanks to the author of this short article for this incredible material

BBC Studios Germany Kicks Off With ‘Miranda’ Adaptation for ZDF Neo – Global Bulletin

) [summary] => PRODUCTION BBC Studios Germany has secured its first commission since launching in the territory this year — a local adaptation of British sitcom “Miranda” — and is co-producing the eight-part series for ZDF Neo with Studio central. “Miranda,” a BBC production written by and starring Miranda Hart, will be adapted for a German audience with ... Read more [atom_content] =>

PRODUCTION

BBC Studios Germany has secured its first commission since launching in the territory this year — a local adaptation of British sitcom “Miranda” — and is co-producing the eight-part series for ZDF Neo with Studio central.

“Miranda,” a BBC production written by and starring Miranda Hart, will be adapted for a German audience with the working title “Ruby” and will be directed by Natascha Beller (“Advent, Advent”). The screenplay is being adapted by Giulia Becker (“Kroymann”) and Anika Soisson (“Findher”) and Anna Böger (“Tatort”) plays the lead role of Ruby. Filming is currently taking place in Cologne.

The show sees Ruby facing the challenges of everyday life in a slightly clumsy way. The cast also includes Irene Rindje and Camill Jammal.

“Miranda” was previously adapted for the U.S. as “Call me Kat,” starring Mayim Bialik (“The Big Bang Theory”), by Fox Television, where it has been renewed for a second season.

BBC Studios Germany also co-produces “The Great Bake Off” with Tower Productions and the RTL version of “Strictly Come Dancing,” titled “Let’s Dance,” with Seapoint Productions.

Conleth Hill, Siobhan McSweeney – “Holding”
Conor Horgan/ITV

CASTING

Oscar winning actor Brenda Fricker (“My Left Foot”), Siobhán McSweeney (“Nowhere Special”), Charlene McKenna (“Bloodlands”), Helen Behan (“The Virtues”) and Pauline McLynn (“Father Ted”) have been cast alongside Conleth Hill (“Game of Thrones”) in U.K. broadcaster ITV’s four-part adaptation of popular chat show host Graham Norton’s bestselling novel “Holding.”

Set in the insular fictional village of Duneen, West Cork, on the edge of Ireland, the series is directed by Kathy Burke (Lady Windermere’s Fan”), written by Dominic Treadwell-Collins (“Family Affairs”) and Karen Cogan (“The Young Offenders”) and produced by Happy Prince and Port Pictures in association with Screen Ireland and co-produced by Virgin Media Television.

The cast also includes Clinton Liberty (“Normal People”), Amy Conroy (“The South Westerlies”), Olwen Fouéré (“Beast”), Eleanor Tiernan (“Bridget and Eamon”), Gary Shelford (“Belgravia”), Lochlann Ó’Meárain (“Smother”), Sky Yang (“Halo”), Demi Issac Oviawe (“The Young Offenders”), Norma Sheahan (“Bridget and Eamon”), and Anne Kent (“Fair City”) .

Hill plays a local police officer who is tasked with solving a serious crime for the first time in his career while McSweeney and McKenna are suspects in the case. Fricker plays a shy presence in Hill’s life who has been battling her own demons and secrets.

ITV’s head of drama, Polly Hill commissioned the series, filming on which is underway at West Cork locations.

Lazy loaded image

“MasterChef Telugu”
Banijay

VERSIONS

Banijay has commissioned four seasons of MasterChef in India in the Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada languages, hosted by hugely popular film stars from those industries.

Vijay Sethupathi (“Master”) will host the Tamil version, Tamannaah Bhatia (“Baahubali”) Telugu, Prithviraj Sukumaran (“Cold Case”) Malayalam and Kichcha Sudeep (“Pailwaan”) Kannada.

All four seasons will be produced by Endemol Shine India for Innovative Film Academy and will air on the Sun Network later this year.

Created by Franc Roddam, “MasterChef” is the world’s most successful cookery television format, produced across 62 markets, with more than 10,000 episodes broadcast. The format is represented internationally by Banijay Rights.

We would love to say thanks to the author of this short article for this incredible material

BBC Studios Germany Kicks Off With ‘Miranda’ Adaptation for ZDF Neo – Global Bulletin

) [7] => Array ( [title] => Lupita Nyong’o mourns co-star in powerful tribute [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/lupita-nyongo-mourns-co-star-in-powerful-tribute/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Pauline Moonlky ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 15:58:08 +0000 [category] => Trending PeopleCostarLupitamournsNyongopowerfultribute [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1551 [description] => Lupita Nyong’o is mourning the death of her friend and “Black Panther” co-star, Chadwick Boseman. Nyong’o, 37, shared a photo of her and a laughing Boseman to Instagram Tuesday along with a powerful tribute to the late actor. This is Nyongo’s first time speaking about Boseman’s death publicly after the actor died Aug. 28 of colon cancer ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

We want to thank the author of this article for this outstanding content

Lupita Nyong’o mourns co-star in powerful tribute

) [summary] => Lupita Nyong’o is mourning the death of her friend and “Black Panther” co-star, Chadwick Boseman. Nyong’o, 37, shared a photo of her and a laughing Boseman to Instagram Tuesday along with a powerful tribute to the late actor. This is Nyongo’s first time speaking about Boseman’s death publicly after the actor died Aug. 28 of colon cancer ... Read more [atom_content] =>

We want to thank the author of this article for this outstanding content

Lupita Nyong’o mourns co-star in powerful tribute

) [8] => Array ( [title] => Francesc Garrido, the Robert Mitchum of Gelida [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/francesc-garrido-the-robert-mitchum-of-gelida/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Sally Scully ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 15:36:16 +0000 [category] => CelebrityFrancescGarridoGelidaMitchumRobert [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1548 [description] => The protagonist of the series ‘I know who you are’ –3.1 million viewers saw the first episode– admits his debt to the bad boy of Hollywood Francesc Garrido (Barcelona, ​​1969) venerates Robert Mitchum. So much so that he confesses to having been inspired by him to give life to his amnesic character of ‘I know ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

The protagonist of the series ‘I know who you are’ –3.1 million viewers saw the first episode– admits his debt to the bad boy of Hollywood

Francesc Garrido (Barcelona, ​​1969) venerates Robert Mitchum. So much so that he confesses to having been inspired by him to give life to his amnesic character of ‘I know who you are’, the black series of Tele 5 which had a great reception last week (3,170,000 viewers). Garrido plays a scheming man who seems to have lost his memory after an accident. He does not remember that he is married, has two children, and owns a law firm. He is accused of the disappearance of his niece, of whom he claims to know nothing. Is your amnesia true? Are we in front of the villain of the story?

Either way, the role of bad guy suits Garrido well. “Playing the villain is more fun”, confesses the actor, who gave us the creeps in the black and splendid film ’25 carats’, where he was engaged in dealing (is a way of saying it) with defaulters. To your movie idol, Mitchum, the bad ones also went to him. In fact, he was the hollywood bad boy (in reality and in fiction). When asked by a journalist why he had decided to star in ‘The night of the hunter’ his response was: “The director called me to propose a script about a real son of a bitch.”

INDIFFERENT TO FAME

The passion for tough and rogue roles is not the only thing that unites Garrido (‘The time between seams’, ‘Isabel’, ‘The adoption’) with its revered Mitchum. The disregard for fame, red carpets and the circus that surrounds the world of cinema also unites them. Have you seen Garrido many times starring in the pink press headlines? What’s more, do you know anything about Garrido that is not strictly professional?

The American claimed not to have seen more than 4 movies in 10 years. The Catalan confesses not to see series

When, in 1993, Mitchum was invited to San Sebastian Festival to receive the Donostia award, asked for an activity plan. The organizers proposed a few official receptions and meetings with the authorities. Completely horrified, Mitchum He replied that he preferred to stay in his quiet ranch without so many tuxedos or ties, he assures Diego Galán (ex-festival director) in the hilarious book of anecdotes about the contest ‘Jack Lemmon never dined here’ (Plaza & Janés). The management corrected and insisted that he would only have to give a press conference and receive the award. Only then did the toughest guy in the movie world accept. He arrived in San Sebastián, but the suitcases were lost on the way. The organization provided him with clothes and when his luggage finally appeared, the actor returned shirts and underwear that he had not used. “This way they will reimburse you for the money in the store,” he assured. Can you be less of a star?

Related news

Toughness is not just a matter of character. Also of physical aspect. Mitchum’s face – who died in 1997 at the age of 79 – spoke volumes about what he had experienced. The face of Garrido It is one of the most manly on the current scene. Although his biography is not nearly as busy. The protagonist of ‘Ryan’s daughter’ (David Lean, 1970) was dedicated in his youth to roam and smoke marijuana. He was a factory operator and a professional boxer, he remembers Juan Tejero on ‘The Wild Hollywood Group’ (T&B Editores).

Mitchum he preferred the tranquility of his ranch Santa Barbara (California) and Garrido, Gelida’s calm. Mitchum confessed to not seeing more than four movies in 10 years. Garrido, who is a movie buff, does not watch series. “I must be the actor who watches the fewest series. Because I don’t have I don’t even have a television antenna.” Garrido and Mitchum. Mitchum and Garrido.

We wish to say thanks to the author of this article for this remarkable material

Francesc Garrido, the Robert Mitchum of Gelida

) [summary] => The protagonist of the series ‘I know who you are’ –3.1 million viewers saw the first episode– admits his debt to the bad boy of Hollywood Francesc Garrido (Barcelona, ​​1969) venerates Robert Mitchum. So much so that he confesses to having been inspired by him to give life to his amnesic character of ‘I know ... Read more [atom_content] =>

The protagonist of the series ‘I know who you are’ –3.1 million viewers saw the first episode– admits his debt to the bad boy of Hollywood

Francesc Garrido (Barcelona, ​​1969) venerates Robert Mitchum. So much so that he confesses to having been inspired by him to give life to his amnesic character of ‘I know who you are’, the black series of Tele 5 which had a great reception last week (3,170,000 viewers). Garrido plays a scheming man who seems to have lost his memory after an accident. He does not remember that he is married, has two children, and owns a law firm. He is accused of the disappearance of his niece, of whom he claims to know nothing. Is your amnesia true? Are we in front of the villain of the story?

Either way, the role of bad guy suits Garrido well. “Playing the villain is more fun”, confesses the actor, who gave us the creeps in the black and splendid film ’25 carats’, where he was engaged in dealing (is a way of saying it) with defaulters. To your movie idol, Mitchum, the bad ones also went to him. In fact, he was the hollywood bad boy (in reality and in fiction). When asked by a journalist why he had decided to star in ‘The night of the hunter’ his response was: “The director called me to propose a script about a real son of a bitch.”

INDIFFERENT TO FAME

The passion for tough and rogue roles is not the only thing that unites Garrido (‘The time between seams’, ‘Isabel’, ‘The adoption’) with its revered Mitchum. The disregard for fame, red carpets and the circus that surrounds the world of cinema also unites them. Have you seen Garrido many times starring in the pink press headlines? What’s more, do you know anything about Garrido that is not strictly professional?

The American claimed not to have seen more than 4 movies in 10 years. The Catalan confesses not to see series

When, in 1993, Mitchum was invited to San Sebastian Festival to receive the Donostia award, asked for an activity plan. The organizers proposed a few official receptions and meetings with the authorities. Completely horrified, Mitchum He replied that he preferred to stay in his quiet ranch without so many tuxedos or ties, he assures Diego Galán (ex-festival director) in the hilarious book of anecdotes about the contest ‘Jack Lemmon never dined here’ (Plaza & Janés). The management corrected and insisted that he would only have to give a press conference and receive the award. Only then did the toughest guy in the movie world accept. He arrived in San Sebastián, but the suitcases were lost on the way. The organization provided him with clothes and when his luggage finally appeared, the actor returned shirts and underwear that he had not used. “This way they will reimburse you for the money in the store,” he assured. Can you be less of a star?

Related news

Toughness is not just a matter of character. Also of physical aspect. Mitchum’s face – who died in 1997 at the age of 79 – spoke volumes about what he had experienced. The face of Garrido It is one of the most manly on the current scene. Although his biography is not nearly as busy. The protagonist of ‘Ryan’s daughter’ (David Lean, 1970) was dedicated in his youth to roam and smoke marijuana. He was a factory operator and a professional boxer, he remembers Juan Tejero on ‘The Wild Hollywood Group’ (T&B Editores).

Mitchum he preferred the tranquility of his ranch Santa Barbara (California) and Garrido, Gelida’s calm. Mitchum confessed to not seeing more than four movies in 10 years. Garrido, who is a movie buff, does not watch series. “I must be the actor who watches the fewest series. Because I don’t have I don’t even have a television antenna.” Garrido and Mitchum. Mitchum and Garrido.

We wish to say thanks to the author of this article for this remarkable material

Francesc Garrido, the Robert Mitchum of Gelida

) [9] => Array ( [title] => VR experiment with rats offers new insights about how neurons enable learning [link] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/vr-experiment-with-rats-offers-new-insights-about-how-neurons-enable-learning/ [dc] => Array ( [creator] => Tony Grantly ) [pubdate] => Tue, 26 Oct 2021 15:34:24 +0000 [category] => Health And ScienceenableexperimentInsightslearningneuronsOffersrats [guid] => https://firstmediamarketing.com/?p=1546 [description] => Journal Reference: Jason J. Moore, Jesse D. Cushman, Lavanya Acharya, Briana Popeney, Mayank R. Mehta. Linking hippocampal multiplexed tuning, Hebbian plasticity and navigation. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03989-z Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, ... Read more [content] => Array ( [encoded] =>

Journal Reference:

  1. Jason J. Moore, Jesse D. Cushman, Lavanya Acharya, Briana Popeney, Mayank R. Mehta. Linking hippocampal multiplexed tuning, Hebbian plasticity and navigation. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03989-z

Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, functions involving networks of millions of neurons. That knowledge could be an important step toward the development of treatments for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy, all of which are related to dysfunction in the hippocampus.

In their latest study, published in the journal Nature, the scientists studied rats in a virtual reality maze. While observing the activities of large numbers of individual neurons in each animal’s hippocampus, the scientists discovered responses in those neurons that revealed a specific mechanism for navigation.

“The hippocampus is one of the first regions to be affected in memory-based diseases like Alzheimer’s,” said the study’s lead author, Jason Moore, a former UCLA postdoctoral scholar who is now at New York University. “So it is crucial to understand its functionality, flexibility and limits.”

The study could help explain why people with damage to the hippocampus struggle not just with so-called spatial tasks, like finding their way home or locating a lost set of keys, but also with memory tasks, such as recalling what they had for lunch or whether they took their daily medication.

The experiment used a type of virtual reality system that was developed in Mehta’s lab. The technology is intended to keep the animals comfortable and avoid causing dizziness and other symptoms that other VR systems can trigger.

For the study, rats were placed on a small treadmill inside a box with images of a maze projected onto the container’s walls. The rats were encouraged to run through the maze to find their reward, a drop of sugar water. In order to make it to the reward, rats needed to discern where they were in relation to the virtual objects around them, where they needed to go to receive their rewards and how far away the destination was.

Several animals were tested over many sessions, enabling the researchers to observe how the neurons’ responses changed as the rats learned to navigate the maze.

The scientists observed that hippocampal neurons encoded multiple aspects of the animal’s location — where it is in space, the angle of its body relative to its reward and how far it has moved along its path — a phenomenon called “multiplexing.”

That finding is significant because it had been widely thought that neurons in the hippocampus code only for position.

“We found that in the virtual maze, the neurons carry very little information about the rat’s position,” said Mehta, a UCLA professor of neurology, neurobiology and physics. “Instead, most neurons encode for other aspects of navigation, such as distance traveled and which direction the body is heading.”

The scientists also observed that as the rats gained experience in the maze, their neurons “remembered” the maze even more reliably and accurately.

Research in Mehta’s lab and elsewhere over the past 25 years has shown that such changes in neurons’ activity — or neuroplasticity — occur via a process neuroscientists call Hebbian learning. That process is mediated by a neurochemical called NMDA, which is a common target for drugs used to treat neurological disorders.

Mehta said the neuroplasticity scientists observed in the rats is likely due to Hebbian learning across billions of synapses. That conclusion was further proven when the researchers injected the animals with substances to inhibit their NMDA, which impaired their performance in the maze.

“Remarkably, neuroplasticity was far greater in the virtual reality environment than in simpler, real-world mazes,” Mehta said. “Further, this boosted neuroplasticity was related to performance.”

Also contributing to the research were co-authors Jesse Cushman, Lavanya Acharya and Brianna Popeny, all of UCLA, as well as several UCLA undergraduate students.

In future studies, Mehta and his colleagues will conduct similar research on rats and on humans with memory impairment, to test wither virtual reality can be used for early diagnosis and to evaluate the effectiveness of medications.

We would love to thank the writer of this article for this outstanding content

VR experiment with rats offers new insights about how neurons enable learning

) [summary] => Journal Reference: Jason J. Moore, Jesse D. Cushman, Lavanya Acharya, Briana Popeney, Mayank R. Mehta. Linking hippocampal multiplexed tuning, Hebbian plasticity and navigation. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03989-z Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, ... Read more [atom_content] =>

Journal Reference:

  1. Jason J. Moore, Jesse D. Cushman, Lavanya Acharya, Briana Popeney, Mayank R. Mehta. Linking hippocampal multiplexed tuning, Hebbian plasticity and navigation. Nature, 2021; DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03989-z

Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, functions involving networks of millions of neurons. That knowledge could be an important step toward the development of treatments for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy, all of which are related to dysfunction in the hippocampus.

In their latest study, published in the journal Nature, the scientists studied rats in a virtual reality maze. While observing the activities of large numbers of individual neurons in each animal’s hippocampus, the scientists discovered responses in those neurons that revealed a specific mechanism for navigation.

“The hippocampus is one of the first regions to be affected in memory-based diseases like Alzheimer’s,” said the study’s lead author, Jason Moore, a former UCLA postdoctoral scholar who is now at New York University. “So it is crucial to understand its functionality, flexibility and limits.”

The study could help explain why people with damage to the hippocampus struggle not just with so-called spatial tasks, like finding their way home or locating a lost set of keys, but also with memory tasks, such as recalling what they had for lunch or whether they took their daily medication.

The experiment used a type of virtual reality system that was developed in Mehta’s lab. The technology is intended to keep the animals comfortable and avoid causing dizziness and other symptoms that other VR systems can trigger.

For the study, rats were placed on a small treadmill inside a box with images of a maze projected onto the container’s walls. The rats were encouraged to run through the maze to find their reward, a drop of sugar water. In order to make it to the reward, rats needed to discern where they were in relation to the virtual objects around them, where they needed to go to receive their rewards and how far away the destination was.

Several animals were tested over many sessions, enabling the researchers to observe how the neurons’ responses changed as the rats learned to navigate the maze.

The scientists observed that hippocampal neurons encoded multiple aspects of the animal’s location — where it is in space, the angle of its body relative to its reward and how far it has moved along its path — a phenomenon called “multiplexing.”

That finding is significant because it had been widely thought that neurons in the hippocampus code only for position.

“We found that in the virtual maze, the neurons carry very little information about the rat’s position,” said Mehta, a UCLA professor of neurology, neurobiology and physics. “Instead, most neurons encode for other aspects of navigation, such as distance traveled and which direction the body is heading.”

The scientists also observed that as the rats gained experience in the maze, their neurons “remembered” the maze even more reliably and accurately.

Research in Mehta’s lab and elsewhere over the past 25 years has shown that such changes in neurons’ activity — or neuroplasticity — occur via a process neuroscientists call Hebbian learning. That process is mediated by a neurochemical called NMDA, which is a common target for drugs used to treat neurological disorders.

Mehta said the neuroplasticity scientists observed in the rats is likely due to Hebbian learning across billions of synapses. That conclusion was further proven when the researchers injected the animals with substances to inhibit their NMDA, which impaired their performance in the maze.

“Remarkably, neuroplasticity was far greater in the virtual reality environment than in simpler, real-world mazes,” Mehta said. “Further, this boosted neuroplasticity was related to performance.”

Also contributing to the research were co-authors Jesse Cushman, Lavanya Acharya and Brianna Popeny, all of UCLA, as well as several UCLA undergraduate students.

In future studies, Mehta and his colleagues will conduct similar research on rats and on humans with memory impairment, to test wither virtual reality can be used for early diagnosis and to evaluate the effectiveness of medications.

We would love to thank the writer of this article for this outstanding content

VR experiment with rats offers new insights about how neurons enable learning

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