• Monday, September 22, 2014
  • A program of IPS Inter Press Service supported by the Dutch MDG3 Fund



    A Brazilian Promise

    20 Sep 2010

    Dilma Rousseff

    Dilma Rousseff

    Dilma Rousseff, Brazil’s leading candidate for the Oct. 3 presidential elections for the ruling Workers Party, and former minister for energy and Cabinet chief of the Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva government, writes exclusively for TerraViva on uniquely Brazilian achievements — with promise of more to come.

    BRASILIA: Ahead of schedule, Brazil was able to reach its poverty-reduction target established under the Millennium Development Goals. Public policies leading towards a country without misery were vigorously implemented in the last eight years, based on a plan to ensure economic development with social inclusion.

    For the first time in many decades, economic growth and distribution of wealth began to walk hand in hand, and today we total 28 million people who have left extreme poverty behind, and another 29 million who have ascended to join the middle class. More »

    A Flavour of Nature, but Better

    20 Sep 2010

    Inocencia Chipana shows off her coffee beans. Credit: Milagros Salazar

    Inocencia Chipana shows off her coffee beans. Credit: Milagros Salazar

    Milagros Salazar

    PUTINA PUNCO: It’s Saturday and the women hurry in to the cooperative’s warehouse in this rural town in southeastern Peru carrying huge bags of coffee beans on their backs.

    It’s a proud burden. Indigenous men and women in this region of Peru produce beans that won an award this year for the best specialty coffees.

    The Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) selected the Tunki beans grown by Wilson Sucaticona, a young farmer from Putina Punco, as one of the nine best coffees of the year at the Roasters Guild Coffees of the Year competition. Tunki coffee was also picked for the London coffee fair. More »

    Headline: Dr Doolittle’s At Home

    20 Sep 2010

    At a graduation ceremony. Credit: Fahim Siddiqi

    At a graduation ceremony. Credit: Fahim Siddiqi

    Zofeen Ebrahim

    KARACHI: Sana Yasir toiled through medical school five years to become a doctor, and followed up with a year’s clinical practice. And then, she got married and quit the workplace. As with Yasir, so with many in Pakistan.

    That means Pakistan could rapidly run short of doctors. Pakistan’s current doctor-patient ratio is about 1:100. In rural areas it can be as high as 1:600-900, says Dr Omar Farooq, pro-vice chancellor of the Dow University of Health Sciences and principal of Sindh Medical College. For every one specialist, says Farooq, there are 14,000 patients. More »

    Women Marching in Step

    20 Sep 2010

    Women step into a male domain in Sierra Leone. Credit: Mohamed Fofanah

    Women step into a male domain in Sierra Leone. Credit: Mohamed Fofanah

    Mohamed Fofanah

    FREETOWN: A woman took position alongside male soldiers at the graveside of a fallen colleague. She positioned her AK47 on her shoulder, and on command fired into the grey sky with the others. Mariatu Sesay became at that moment the first woman in the Sierra Leone army to take part in a 21-gun salute to honour a dead soldier.

    Onlookers were not used to seeing women in such a role. Yet women are becoming a more common sight in the Republic of Sierra Leone Armed Forces (RSLAF), after a gender policy introduced to ensure equal opportunities, with support from the Accra-based women, peace and security network WISPEN and the UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM). More »

    Gender Justice Key to MDG Progress

    20 Sep 2010

    inesalberdi_03

    Inés Alberdi. Credit: UNIFEM

    Inés Alberdi*

    With five years remaining to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the 2010 MDG Summit challenges world leaders everywhere to commit to actions to accelerate progress. A UNIFEM briefing, excerpted from its forthcoming report on women’s access to justice, points to key areas where such actions are critical.

    It shows that despite promising progress on many of the MDG targets, national averages mask large disparities in terms of gender, income and location, with large numbers of women and girls being left behind, especially in rural areas. More »

    Hunger Haunts Niger

    20 Sep 2010

    Credit WFP

    Women at the cereal bank, Niger. Credit WFP/Judith Schuler

    Niamey/Rome: More than seven million people, more than half the population of Niger that is, remains at risk of starvation despite a marginal improvement in recent days. And of that half, women are far more at risk, and far more affected by the severe shortages.

    “We have launched a massive campaign to feed millions of people hit by drought, poor harvests and high food prices,” World Food Programme (WFP) spokesperson Jane Howard told TerraViva. “We are focusing on the needs of women and children, who are always the most vulnerable in this kind of crisis.” More »

    New Nets Offer Some Safety

    20 Sep 2010

    New budgetary allocations make work safer for women.

    New budgetary allocations make work safer for women.

    Joshua Kyalimpa

    Kampala: Robinah Nabukalu sings to her three-week baby before laying her down to sleep. Both will rest easier at their house in Rubaga in Kampala under an insecticide-treated net provided by the government under a gender-sensitive budgeting effort.

    “Before, I suffered frequent malaria attacks, even during my pregnancy,” says Nabukalu. “Now malaria is a thing of the past, and my baby is safely protected.” More »

    US Confronts its Dying Mums

    20 Sep 2010

     Obstetrical nurse Melissa Hilmanowske

    Obstetrical nurse Melissa Hilmanowske

    Amanda Bransford

    NEW YORK: The United States spends more money on healthcare than any other country in the world. It also has a higher maternal mortality rate than nearly any other highly economically developed nation, and higher than that of 39 other countries.

    The federal government set a goal in 1998 to achieve a rate of 4.3 deaths as a result of pregnancy and childbirth per 100,000 pregnancies by 2010. This goal is far from attained: the current rate is 13.3 per 100,000, with much higher rates among minority groups. The rate in 1980 was 9.2. — significantly lower than it is today. More »

    Women six times more at HIV risk

    20 Sep 2010

    hiv1Susan Anyangu-Amu

    NAIROBI: It’s been clear for some time that AIDS is hitting women harder than men. But it could be getting worse: in Kenya government figures show young women aged 15-24 are six times more likely to be HIV-positive than their male counterparts.

    Other figures suggest that at least 60 percent of people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa are women.

    Some of the factors are familiar, such as lack of economic independence, and social factors that mean women are frequently unable to insist their sexual partners use condoms. More »