• Saturday, August 23, 2014
  • A program of IPS Inter Press Service supported by the Dutch MDG3 Fund

    Gender Masala - Notes on gender - A spicy mix

    This blog brings out the flavour of gender issues, from the network of IPS writers and friends. Gender Masala is part of the Inter Press Service project Communicating for Change: Getting Voice, Visibility and Impact for Gender Equality. Check it at www.ips.org/mdg3/


    CSW 56: Week Two

    09 Mar 2012

    Catch up on our coverage from the past week, below, as the United Nations’ 56th session of the Commission on the Status of Women comes to a close. Click here for coverage from week one.

    Female construction workers in Rio de Janeiro. Brazilian women have been making headway in traditionally male-dominated fields. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPS

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    IWD: Keeping Girls Safe at Home, at School and in Their Communities

    08 Mar 2012

    By Equality Now*

    “To be able to realise their full potential in society as women, girls need to be empowered to raise their voices against injustices committed against them and they need a system that will support their quest for justice.”

    Young girls in the village of Sonu Khan Almani in Pakistan's Sindh province perform most of the household chores, like making bread. Credit: Zofeen Ebrahim/IPS

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    From Our Mailbox: Advancing MDG3 in India by Including Boys

    02 Nov 2011

    Advancing gender equality means a shift in thinking — from seeing boys and men as part of the problem, to including boys and men as part of the solution. (Credit: Sujoy Dhar/IPS)

    Dear Editors,

    Thanks for the story on working with males and females on gender equality.

    You may also be interested in work that ICRW has done in this area. We developed and evaluated a program called “Gender Equity Movement in Schools” that is now being scaled up to 250 schools in Mumbai. Additionally, the project team has traveled to Vietnam for discussion on adapting the program to the Vietnamese setting.

    Ellen Weiss
    Senior Technical Advisor
    Research Utilization and Development
    International Center for Research on Women

    Out of 157 countries, India ranks in the bottom three for girls’ and women’s education, economic participation and empowerment in the latest Gender Equity Index compiled by international NGO Social Watch, followed only by Côte d’Ivoire and Yemen.

    ICRW’s two-year programme uses games and role-play to engage 12- to 14-year old boys and girls in fostering equitable relations and scrutinising the social norms that construct gender roles. The students also learn how to spot and combat gender-based violence.

    How are you advancing the third millennium development goal? We want to hear from you! Send us your ideas, examples and comments for making the world more gender equitable: mdg3 [at] ips [dot] org.

    Dispatch from Kibera, East Africa’s Largest Slum

    19 Aug 2011

    Photo Essay by Aline Cunico

    (IPS/Aline Cunico)(IPS/Aline Cunico)

    Considered one of the biggest slums in the world, Kibera is Nairobi’s–and East Africa’s–largest urban settlement. Over one million people struggle daily to meet basic needs such as access to water, nutrition and sanitation. In this community lacking education and opportunities, women and girls are most affected by poverty.

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    Afghanistan, The Worst Place To Be A Mother Or A Child

    16 Jul 2011

    Human Wrongs Watch

    In spite of U.S-led military invasion since 2001 to bring “enduring freedom” and democracy, about 50 women die in childbirth each day in Afghanistan; one in three is physically or sexually abused, and the average life expectancy of women is 44 years.

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    The baby elephant in the room

    08 Apr 2010

    Guest blogger Trevor Davies

    Are we missing something in the gender debate? Credit: Zuwa Davies

    Are we missing something in the gender debate? Credit: Zuwa Davies

    Simple things sometimes seem the most difficult to accept. We protest that the hardest place to tackle gender inequity is in the privacy of the home and then we spend little or no time in our work on women’s rights, feminism and masculinities examining the area where we interact most in the home – in the raising of our children.
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    When migrant labour hurts families

    08 Feb 2010

    Tess Bacalla

    How does one tell a child that it is for his own future that his mother has to go offshore in search of the proverbial ‘greener pastures’, leaving behind a family that has never known the meaning of separation?

    Just what does that assurance mean to a child anyway whose notion of a secure tomorrow could simply be waking up each morning with his mother by his side.
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    Famous and infamous births

    21 Dec 2009

    By Paula Modersohn Becker

    By Paula Modersohn Becker

    When is a photo of a woman giving birth considered pornographic? Take your pick:

    A. When it is shown in a pornographic magazine, film or website.
    B. Never.
    C. When it is emailed to government officials urging action to improve public health.

    One could argue about A and B but this blog is about C.

    Earlier this year, in Zambia, Chansa Kabwela, news editor at the feisty opposition newspaper The Post, was charged with circulating pornography with intent to corrupt public morals. More »

    Living a woman’s life

    04 Dec 2009

    Today at noon my daughter graduated from high school. In the afternoon, the email brought news about very dear friends.

    Motherhood, sisterhood, friendship.

    Motherhood, sisterhood, friendship.

    In Paris, the Chilean researcher, novelist and feminist Ana (Nicha) Vazquez Bronfman had died, aged 71. She was a beacon for a generation of Latin American women for her insights on identity  and gender. One concept she elaborated specially was “transculturation” – the permanent construction of identities in this world of global migration. In 2006 she wrote superbly about sexuality among the elderly – transgressions and secrets, she called it.

    In Rome, my friend and fellow journalist Paola Rolletta underwent the next to last chemotherapy session against breast cancer. She was jubilant to see the end of the chemical bombardment. Like antiretrovirals, chemo saves lives but is no picnic.   More »