• Wednesday, August 20, 2014
  • A program of IPS Inter Press Service supported by the Dutch MDG3 Fund

    Q&A: India’s Anti-Women Laws Dropping from the Books Liza Jansen interviews Indian Jurist SUJATA MANOHAR

    03 Dec 2009


    Sujata Manohar  Credit:Bomoon Lee/IPS

    Sujata Manohar Credit:Bomoon Lee/IPS

    UNITED NATIONS, Dec 2 (IPS) – The 30th anniversary of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) this month has brought women’s rights champions from around the world to the United Nations to share their success stories. One is Sujata Manohar, who helped create a national law in India that bars sexual harassment in the workplace.

    “Some people believe the traditional way of life is better, but they are not in the majority and there is a clear move towards elimination of all kinds of discrimination,” says Manohar, a Supreme Court justice.

    CEDAW, adopted in December 1979 by the U.N. General Assembly, is an international human rights treaty exclusively devoted to gender equality and is often described as an international bill of rights for women.

    The Convention consists of 30 articles defining discrimination against women and an agenda for national action to end such discrimination. More »

    GENDER: “Truly Exciting If the U.S. Could Ratify CEDAW” – Part 2

    15 Nov 2009

     

    Security Council debates protection of civilians - and women - in armed conflicts. Credit: U.N.

    Security Council debates protection of civilians - and women - in armed conflicts. Credit: U.N.

    Miren Gutierrez* interviews INES ALBERDI, executive director of UNIFEM

    ROME, Nov 15 (IPS) – CEDAW or the U.N. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Violence Against Women (CEDAW) was adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 1979.

    On its 30th anniversary, just seven U.N. member states continue to refuse to accept the only international instrument that comprehensively addresses women’s rights within political, civil, cultural, economic and social life. 

    In the second of a two-part interview IPS talks to Ines Alberdi, executive director of UNIFEM, about the countries holding out, including the U.S., and the new agency for women that the General Assembly has decided to create.  More »

    GENDER: Laws, Budgets and Pigeonholes – Part 1

    15 Nov 2009

     

    Ines Alberdi: "CEDAW is the means by which governments (can) advance gender equality". Credit: U.N.

    Ines Alberdi: "CEDAW is the means by which governments (can) advance gender equality". Credit: U.N.

    Miren Gutierrez* interviews INES ALBERDI, executive director of UNIFEM

    ROME, Nov 15 (IPS) – The fight for women’s rights came about hand in hand with the struggle for democracy, civil rights and national liberation in different countries and periods, says Ines Alberdi, executive director of UNIFEM.

    The time has now come for action on the effect of the global financial crisis on women, and other problems such as stereotyping, gender-based violence, unfair budgeting, lack of work opportunities and social protection for women, and the plight of women migrants. 

    On the eve of its 30th anniversary, Alberdi spells out the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) for IPS. The first of a two-part interview.  More »

    “CEDAW is UNIFEM’S Entry Point”, IPS interviews JOANNE SANDLER, Deputy Executive Director, UNIFEM*

    09 Nov 2009

    Joanne Sandler - Credit: UNIFEM

    Joanne Sandler - Credit: UNIFEM

    By Andrea Borde

    UNITED NATIONS, Nov 9 (IPS) – On Sep. 14, the United Nations (U.N.) General Assembly adopted a resolution that opened the door for the creation of a new U.N. agency specifically for women.

    It will draw together under one umbrella all of the existing entities for women in the U.N. – U.N. Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM), Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW), International Training and Research Institute for the Advancement of Women (INSTRAW) and Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues (OSAGI).

    The new women’s entity comes at a particularly exciting time in the women’s empowerment movement at the U.N. as another report has just been released by the U.N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) highlighting the lack of women’s control over economic and financial resources in both the developing and developed world.

    The U.N. World Survey on the Role of Women in Development 2009, published by UNDESA addresses increasingly progressive issues such as women’s unpaid work in the household, the urgency of women’s financial empowerment, especially in current times of economic turmoil, and the long-standing inequalities of women in care giving, the labour market and within central financial institutions of the state such as financial ministries and central banks. More »

    RIGHTS: Obama Urged to Fully Comply with Anti-Torture Treaty

    26 Oct 2009

    By William Fisher

    NEW YORK, Oct 26 (IPS) – The fifteenth anniversary of the U.S. ratification of the United Nations Convention Against Torture passed last week with little fanfare and virtually no press attention from the mainstream media here.

    But according to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), “U.S. policy continues to fall short of ensuring full compliance with the treaty.”

    For example, the organisation said that an appendix to the Army Field Manual (AFM) can still facilitate cruel treatment of prisoners and detainees at home and abroad. More »